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9 08, 2017

Additive Manufacturing Changes How We Think About Design

By | 2017-12-22T08:25:48+00:00 August 9th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

As 3D printing has become more and more mainstream, the traditional resource and skills barriers for manufacturing are all but vanishing. This trend is changing the very face of design. For the first time, producing complex products is no more difficult, expensive, or time-consuming than making simpler objects. 3D printing a block with holes, notches, and rounded edges is as approachable as printing a solid block once was. The 3D printers give designers unprecedented control over the shape and composition of matter. High-end 3D printers can combine multiple materials into arbitrary patterns at a high resolution, leading to the ability to create geometry with fidelity and complexity never before seen. Traditionally, making more complex objects required a heavy investment in time, equipment, energy, and labor. Now, the cost of adding an additional design feature is reduced, potentially triggering nothing short of a manufacturing revolution similar to the first industrial revolution triggered when the cost of power was similarly diminished. And as 3D printing evolves, these products can be produced quickly and produced in bulk. The Factory of the Future is Here Now Manufacturers are finding applications for additive manufacturing that go beyond experimentation—and that instead are relevant, practical, and profitable. [...]

4 08, 2017

Additive Manufacturing Will Change How We Think About Design

By | 2017-08-04T08:28:50+00:00 August 4th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

As 3D printing has become more and more mainstream, the traditional resource and skills barriers for manufacturing are all but vanishing. This trend is changing the very face of design. For the first time, producing complex products is no more difficult, expensive, or time consuming than making simpler objects. 3D printing a block with holes, notches, and rounded edges is as approachable as printing a solid block once was. The 3D printers give designers unprecedented control over the shape and composition of matter. High-end 3D printers can combine multiple materials into arbitrary patterns at a high resolution, leading to the ability to create geometry with fidelity and complexity never before seen. Traditionally, making more complex objects required a heavy investment in time, equipment, energy, and labor. Now, the cost of adding an additional design feature is reduced, potentially triggering nothing short of a manufacturing revolution similar to the first industrial revolution triggered when the cost of power was similarly diminished. And as 3D printing evolves, these products can be produced quickly and produced in bulk. The Factory of the Future is Here Now Manufacturers are finding applications for additive manufacturing that go beyond experimentation—and that instead are relevant, practical, and [...]

19 07, 2017

Additive Manufacturing Innovating the Future of Aviation

By | 2017-12-22T08:29:55+00:00 July 19th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

As the adoption of additive manufacturing processes continues to take hold in aviation, with leaders like Airbus incorporating hundreds of printed parts on their new generation aircraft, and Boeing production lines, we’re starting to recognize a next level of maturity in how regulations are being implemented to accommodate for these changes. Airline carriers are beginning to use additive manufacturing to reduce inventory and alleviate supply chain constraints, but there is no better example of 3D printing’s robust and flexible usage than on the design of aircraft interiors. Many airlines understand that the accommodating comfort and offering a differentiated passenger experience are central to their customer’s loyalty and provide a lasting impression for their brand. This is one area that many carriers spare no expense or effort in order to create the refined and distinct cabin experiences that their customers demand. And while every part on an aircraft must meet strict airworthiness standards, the lower criticality of interior components allows for the effective introduction of additive manufacturing to enable customization of interior components cost effectively for the first time. As manufacturers look to the future to define how 3D printing and connected processes can better meet their business demands and reduce [...]

5 07, 2017

3D Printed Aircraft Interior Innovations

By | 2017-12-22T08:35:12+00:00 July 5th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

Think about the last time you took a commercial flight. What are some of the distinct things you remember about the aircraft cabin? If you could, how would you change some of the design elements using 3D printing technologies? The Paris Airshow recently took place and Stratasys was there to exhibit some of the new and innovative ways they think about aircraft interiors. From individual part weight reduction to a more comfortable layout and design, the future of aircraft interiors is set to take off in innovative ways. To celebrate the huge aviation industry event they have created an augmented reality experience that takes you inside of an airline cabin to ponder all of the ways that 3D printing can impact passenger aircraft interior design and creation. Just click on the video below to experience it. For more information on our complete line of Stratasys 3D printers, please click the button below.  

23 06, 2017

Infinite Build 3D Printer

By | 2017-06-23T08:49:34+00:00 June 23rd, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

There’s a revolutionary new technology in 3D printing called the Stratasys Infinite Build. 3D printing has provided a means to produce highly accurate parts in a variety of build sizes. With production machines like the Fortus 900 and Objet 1000, industry leaders in both aerospace and automotive have been able to experiment with increasingly larger prototypes and production parts. Nonetheless, there has always been a ceiling (or cap) on the size of a part making 3D printing infeasible for certain processes. With the new Infinite-Build 3D Demonstrator, we're provided a glimpse of what the future could hold for 3D printing in manufacturing. Developed for large part production, the Infinite-Build is designed to address the uncompromising requirements of aerospace, automotive and other industries. Based on proven FDM technology, the demonstrator can generate large, lightweight, thermoplastic parts with repeatable mechanical properties. Rather than printing layer by layer in an enclosed build chamber, the solution uses an infinite-build approach by literally turning the 3D printer on its side with an open chamber. Parts are printed on a vertical plane, resulting in practically unlimited part size in the build direction. The Inifinite build uses micro pellets the size of a grain of sand rather [...]

12 05, 2017

Simplify Sacrificial Tooling with 3D Printing

By | 2017-05-12T07:56:46+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

The Problem: Complex composite parts with hollow interiors are difficult to manufacture. Complex composite structures, with hollow interiors, present unique manufacturing challenges where internal tooling, generally referred to as a cores or mandrel, is required to define the hollow internal features. Any part configuration that traps the mandrel inside the composite part, requires sacrificial tooling* or a more complex, collapsible or inflatable tool. *Sacrificial tooling – tooling that is only used once and must be broken or washed out. Current sacrificial tooling technology uses materials such as eutectic salts, ceramics, cast urethanes and other similar materials. These options present many challenges, including: Difficulty handling due to fragile material properties Require tooling to produce Limit design freedom due to production or removal methods The Solution: 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Stratasys FDM® technology is capable of producing geometries in dissolvable thermoplastic materials. Although these materials were originally developed to serve as support structures to enable printing highly complex geometries, OEMs and tier suppliers in the automotive and aerospace industries have been utilizing their unique dissolving properties for sacrificial mandrels. In an effort to improve their solution and value to the sacrificial tooling market, Stratasys released a new soluble material dubbed ST130™ along [...]

10 05, 2017

Nylon 12CF – New 3D Printing Material

By | 2017-05-10T08:41:45+00:00 May 10th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

There is a new game-changing thermoplastic material for the Stratasys FDM family called Nylon 12CF. The CF is an abbreviation for carbon filled. In this material, chopped carbon fibers are added to a proven FDM Nylon 12 polymer blend resulting in one of the strongest thermoplastics in the FDM material portfolio. Commercial production of carbon fiber began in the early 1960's, resulting from requirements for lighter weight parts and alternatives to metal. Its low thermal expansion, heat resistance, and chemical stability made it a viable solution for aerospace parts as it offered ten-times the strength of steel at one-quarter of the weight. Over the years, the use of carbon fiber branched out into many other industries. It is extremely popular in performance racing, where it is used to create composites that are light and have exceptional fatigue characteristics. For 3D printing, Nylon 12 CF provides the highest flexural strength and highest stiffness-to-weight ratio of any FDM material currently produced and a tensile strength on par with other high-performance FDM materials. Appropriate uses include strong but lightweight tooling, functional prototypes and end-use parts in aerospace, automotive, recreational and industrial applications. In tooling applications, thermoplastics might have the strength but lack the [...]

5 05, 2017

3D Printing to Treat Complex Structural Heart Disease

By | 2017-05-05T08:30:11+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Categories: 3D Printing / Additive Mfg, Stratasys|0 Comments

3D printing is a powerful technology with the potential to significantly change the practice of medicine. In the field of structural heart disease, this rapidly evolving technology can make a powerful impact. Limitations of two-dimensional imaging and added benefits of 3D printing Current conventional cardiac imaging modalities such as echocardiography (EKG), cardiac computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) primarily utilize two-dimensional (2D) methods that require significant expertise and experience to interpret. In the field of pediatric or congenital cardiology, complex structural heart disease requires precise anatomical delineation before intervention. Consider a heart no larger than a walnut with multiple levels of abnormal connections. Using standard methods of visualization, whether by echo, CT or MRI, the interpreter essentially “reconstructs” a three-dimensional (3D) image from multiple slices or sweeps through this complex heart. By and large, this method works well for the structurally normal heart or for “simple” lesions (1); however, the challenges of interpretation and potential for errors are compounded for heart lesions of moderate or great complexity (1). Three-dimensional methods of visualization such as 3D echo, volume or surface rendering give the added perception of depth, but they are fundamentally limited by 2D displays on which they are [...]

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